Monthly Archives: April 2011

Dear Computer Customer Support Email Answerers:

Thank you for your rapid response to my inquiry regarding the poor battery life of my new tablet. Thank you also for your responses to the various issues I have had with various electronics over the past 15-20 years or so. I appreciate your attentiveness to my needs.

However, may I make a gentle request, something that may increase the faith and good will your customers in terms of resolving both the current difficulty and whatever issues might occur in the future?

I realize that the vast majority of “this doesn’t work” emails probably result from consumer ignorance and idiocy, and I can fully understand that you may have a very low opinion of the computer-savviness of your customer base.  But when someone writes a letter saying, “I have tried this, and this, and this, and I have watched no video, and I have listened to no media, and blah blah blah,” is it really necessary to send a condescending email about the level of resources this and this and the other process, like HD video and hi-res music, burns up in the machine?  And then to say, “so please try not doing all those things, and if all else fails, this update should resolve your issues”?

Would it cost you so much, instead, to take the approach of “Wow, two hours of battery life under any circumstances seems low, and we’re sorry this is happening! In case you have not already done so, just to make sure you don’t have to send in your device when it’s not necessary, let us see if this is a software issue rather than a hardware one; this  update might address the problem. ”

Just a suggestion.  Read the email before sending the form response. Respond in a way that at least respects the possibility of your customer not being an idiot, if it does not assume so.

And no offense, but a device that promises 18 hours of video play on a single charge should not, at 5 days old, get only two hours of active battery life under any circumstances.

Grr.